Aircraft ground support equipment (GSE) refers to the equipment and components that are used to provide servicing and operations for aircraft in-between flights while they are grounded. GSE components and equipment may be used for aircraft mobility, loading operations, ground power operations, and other operations as needed. As commercial aircraft and airliners adhere to strict flight schedules, the efficiency and speed of aircraft ground support services is always a facet that providers strive to improve in order to minimize turnaround times. Over the forecast period of 2019 to 2025, the market for aircraft ground support equipment is expected to increase by $2.2 billion, equaling a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 4.45%. Altogether, this forecast puts the total market value at $9.7 billion by 2025. From technological advancements of GSE equipment to steadily increasing passenger air traffic, many factors contribute to this upwards growth. In this blog, we will discuss how ground support equipment aids in aircraft servicing, as well as the factors contributing to the market growth for the 2019-2025 forecast period.

In general, aircraft ground support equipment and services are not only tied to maintaining the aircraft’s ability to fly, but also encompass many other services and operations. In-between flights, GSE operations ensure that passenger comfort and safety is established and well maintained. This includes cleaning passenger cabins to remove trash and waste, as well as the restocking of consumables. GSE services also include cycling items such as blankets, pillows, magazines, tissues, and soap to maintain cleanliness for passengers. During this time, security of the aircraft can be established as personnel check for any concerning paraphernalia left behind after a flight. During their normal routines, GSE services will also remove waste from lavatories, cater food and drinks, and even provide electricity and air conditioning for terminal gates for crew and passenger comfort.

Nevertheless, aircraft ground support equipment will also be used for many normal in-between flight tasks. During this time, GSE personnel aid with the loading and unloading of cargo and passengers, refuel the aircraft, examine engines and the fuselage, and perform other ground operations to ensure safety and optimal operation of the aircraft before its next scheduled flight. Often, all of these ground services will be fulfilled by a subcontracted airport or handling agent. With smaller airlines, larger carriers may be subtracted, or they may establish a Maintenance and Ground Support Agreement with another airliner. To perform their operations, ground services utilize GSE components such as dollies, chocks, tripod jacks, service stairs, refuels, tugs, tractors, ground power units, buses, container loaders, and other vehicles and equipment.

Due to their benefits and services for aircraft preparation and operation, combined with an increased amount of air traffic, demand for GSE components and equipment is on the rise. Electric ground support equipment has been seeing increased amounts of interest, especially with the advent of more automated equipment options. Automation with robotic technology is slowly being introduced, allowing for streamlined operations such as automatic shut downs, ID cards for authorization, and electronic check-ins such as seat belt requirements before equipment can be turned on. Robotic handling of baggage is also becoming automated in certain airports across the world. Altogether, automation allows for increased safety and reduction on costs.

As the aviation industry is constantly expanding and moving into developing countries, the need for GSE operations also increases. Emerging economies and markets, such as the Asia Pacific and Middle East regions, are expected to contribute to the non-electric segment of the GSE market. The Middle East has the highest projected GSE CAGR growth, attributable to the amount of airports that are being constructed as air traffic expands. Meanwhile, electric and hybrid GSE markets continue to grow in areas such as North America, which continues to be a majority contributor to the overall market. Major players in the ground support equipment market include JBT Corporation, Tug Technologies Corporation, Tronair, Teleflex Lionel-Dupont, Cavotex, ITW GSE, Guangtai, among others.

With a great amount of markets across the world becoming invested in various GSE market segments, market growth should continue to rise and develop. When you are searching for parts for your ground support equipment operations, Aerospace Unlimited is your one-stop-shop for premium parts and solutions. Whether you need a tool bag, pin assy, or other GSE component, we can help you source everything you need with competitive prices and quick lead-times on even the most hard-to-find parts.


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Within the realm of aviation, landing gear proves to be one of the most important systems of the entire aircraft. Through the many aircraft landing gear components working together, an aircraft is able to touch ground and come to a stop safely and efficiently, avoiding damages. This is due to their specifically engineered designs that are in place to meet various requirements of weight, size, performance, and beyond as per FAA regulations. In this blog, we will discuss the aircraft landing gear system and how it helps bring an aircraft safely to a stop after flight.

Aircraft landing gear components work together to aid the aircraft during taxiing, landing, and take-off operations. Due to various needs and requirements surrounding these operations, landing gear is more often than not the first consideration and designed component of an aircraft. Designing and manufacturing landing gear can be a lengthy process due to having to uphold various required airworthiness regulations and to best serve the aircraft they are intended for. Depending on the type of aircraft and its application, different designs and equipment may be utilized as well.

To achieve a successful landing, each of the aircraft landing gear components have their own functionality and purpose. Piston landing gear, such as airplane wheels, are often fitted with shock absorbers to take the impact forces of landing off of the fuselage, and wheels also allow for taxiing around a runway. Disc brake and other brake types on the wheels have the important function of slowing down the aircraft speed until it can safely stop or taxi. Airplane wheels may also be installed in various numbers and arrangements, the most common being the taildragger and tricycle undercarriage. Often, landing gear may have the ability to be retractable and can be deployed and/or retracted into the fuselage while in flight with the aid of hydraulic systems. With retractable landing gear, aircraft can reduce drag that would be caused by the wheels and other systems.

Future plans for developing landing gear technologies include using high strength materials, damping systems, and electronic actuation. With high strength materials, fatigue and corrosion can be reduced for longer equipment lifespan. Damping systems are important to reduce fatigue and wear as well, as these electronic systems are slowly proving to be a very viable alternative for the replacement of hydraulic actuation systems. This is due to the fact that electric actuation systems are beginning to compete in weight, and do not have the problem of flammability and leaking that hydraulic systems have. Beyond these examples, there are many other goals of the aviation community to bring improvements to landing gear design and functionality.

When designing or maintaining your aircraft landing gear system, know that Aerospace Unlimited has you covered with our expansive inventory of over six billion parts. We understand that the parts procurement process can seem difficult, so we work to make it as simple as possible for you. Our expert staff are on hand to aid our customers with any questions that they may have during the purchasing process, and we can provide quick lead-times on hard to find and obsolete components.

Aerospace Unlimited is owned and operated by ASAP Semiconductor, and we can help you find arm assembly torque parts and other aviation components you need, new or obsolete. As a premier supplier of parts for the aerospace, civil aviation, and defense industries, we're always available and ready to help you find all the parts and equipment you need, 24/7x365. Our dedication to quality and our customers is why we are proud to be an FAA AC 00-56B accredited and ISO 9001:2015 certified enterprise. For a quick and competitive quote, email us at sales@aerospaceunlimited.com or call us at +1-412-212-0606.


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PMA stands for Parts Manufacturer Approval. This approval is what allows for manufacturers to produce and sell articles for installation on type certification products. The approval can only be given by the United States Federal Aviation Administration. Simply put, the FAA is required to utilize the PMA process to greenlight the design and manufacturing of certain aviation and aerospace parts. Designing, manufacturing, distributing and operating with such a part that has not gone through the approval process is illegal and subject to severe punishments. For more information on how the PMA process works, you can read more about it in the article below.

You can observe a great example of the PMA process when aviation companies need to acquire replacement parts (such as an aircraft brake) for a commercial or corporate jet. In order to procure these parts, they must ensure that the desired piece passes the PMA phase. This involves the FAA identifying airworthiness standards before applying them to the part and then determining the criticality of this part. The two FAA branches involved in implementing this are the Aircraft Certification Offices (ACO’s) and the Manufacturing Inspection District Offices (MIDO’s). Afterwards, aviation authorities would submit a test plan for its design approval and if passed, establish an inspection system to scrutinize the nooks and crannies of the piece.

If the piece passes this phase of the process, the PMA part would then need established instructions for repair and inspection, followed by instructions for a continued operational safety plan. Once everything has been set in place and tests have been run enough times to prove the airworthiness of the part, only then can the ACO and MIDO give the final approval that the part is suitable enough to fly the skies.

At Aerospace Unlimited, owned and operated by ASAP Semiconductor, we can help you find aircraft components and accessories you need, new or obsolete. As a premier supplier of parts for the aerospace, civil aviation, and defense industries, we're always available and ready to help you find all the parts and equipment you need, 24/7x365. For a quick and competitive quote, email us at sales@aerospaceunlimited.com or call us at +1-412-212-0606.


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Aircraft wings are airfoils that attach to the body of an aircraft at different angles and shapes to create lift and sustain flight. Different wing configurations provide variant flight characteristics like the amount of lift generated, the level of control at different operating speeds, aircraft stability and flight balance. Aircraft wings may be attached at the bottom, mid or top of the fuselage. The wing tip can be pointed, rounded or square and the wing can extend out from the fuselage perpendicularly , angled down or slightly up. The angle at which a wing extends out from the fuselage’s horizontal state is called the dihedral angle and this affects an aircraft’s lateral stability.

Wings are mostly constructed using aluminum, but they can also be made using wood covered with fabric, magnesium alloy, carbon fiber, and in modern aircraft, stronger and lighter materials like titanium. The framing of aircraft wings are outlined by beam like spars. The ribs of a wing are connected to these spars and provide sound structure and stability. Lastly, the entire aircraft from fuselage to wingspan is covered in a skin that ensures the aircraft moves through the sky as one unified body.

There are 9 types of wing design that each offer their own unique capabilities. The rectangle wing (not aerodynamically efficient) is your basic non-tapered, straight wing, mostly used in small aircraft, extending perpendicular to the fuselage. Elliptical wings (most aerodynamically efficient) induce the lowest possible drag and their thin wing structure was initially designed to house landing gear, ammunition and guns inside the wing. The chord of a tapered wing varies across it’s span for approximate elliptical lift distribution.

Delta wings are triangular in shape and lay over the fuselage. Their low aspect ratio makes them ideal in supersonic, subsonic, and transonic flight. These wings have improved maneuverability and reduced wing loading but due to their low aspect ratio, do have a high induced drag. Trapezoidal wings offer outstanding flight performance, highly efficient supersonic flight, and have great stealth characteristics. Ogive wings are designed for very high speeds, have minimal drag at supersonic speeds, but are very complex and difficult to manufacture. Most high-speed commercial aircraft use a swept-back wing design that reduces drag at transonic speeds. Forward-swept wings have controllability issues and because of the flow characteristics the outboard wings stall before the flaps. Variable sweep wings were designed to optimize flight experience over a range of speeds and have three modes of extension: straight out to the side, slightly back, and farther back to create a triangle shaped aircraft.

At Aerospace Unlimited, owned and operated by ASAP Semiconductor, we can help you find the aircraft wing components you need, new or obsolete. As a premier supplier of parts for the aerospace, civil aviation, and defense industries, we're always available and ready to help you find all the parts and equipment you need, 24/7x365. For a quick and competitive quote, email us at sales@aerospaceunlimited.com or call us at +1-412-212-0606.


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Aircraft are defined by their wings. The shape, size, and configuration will affect all aspects of an aircraft’s performance and specifications. Wings are airfoils, shapes designed to create lift when moving rapidly through the air. This lift, combined with the thrust generated by the aircraft’s engine or engines, is what allows an aircraft to fly.

Wings come in various different configurations and shapes, depending on the requirements of the aircraft and its intended use. A wing’s shape will determine how much lift it generates, how the aircraft controls at various operating speeds, stability, balance, and more. Both the trailing edge and leading edge of an aircraft wing can be curved or straight, and wings can attach at various points on the fuselage- bottom, middle, or on the top. There is also the wing dihedral angle, which is the angle at which the wing is set, either perpendicular, or angled up or down.

Aircraft wings are typically built in a complete cantilever design, meaning that they do not require external bracing or support, and are internally supported by structural members and the aircraft’s string. Some designs, however, do feature external wires or struts to prevent vibration and maintain structural integrity. Most wings are built from aluminum, but older aircraft will use wood frames covered in fabric. Modern aircraft often use carbon fiber materials in their construction as well. Wings typically consist of stringers and spars that run spanwise, and formers, bulkheads, and ribs that run chordwise, from leading edge to trailing edge.

Common wing shapes include:

Rectangular:

The rectangular wing is easy to manufacture, and features a non-tapered, straight design used mostly in small aircraft that extends from the fuselage at a 90 degree angle. However, rectangular wings are not very aerodynamically efficient.

Elliptical:

These wings are very aerodynamically efficient and induce minimal drag. However, they are very difficult to manufacture. Elliptical wings were originally designed for military aircraft to house landing gear, guns, and ammunition inside a wing. The ellipse shape was designed to offer the thinnest possible wing, all while holding all these components.

Tapered:

Created as a compromise between elliptical and rectangular designs, tapered wings feature a chord that gradually grows smaller closer to the tip. While not as efficient as elliptical wings, tapered wings offer a compromise between efficiency and manufacturability.

Swept-wing:

Most modern aircraft feature swept-back wings, as they reduce drag and maintain controllability while flying at transonic speeds.

Delta:

Essentially a massive triangle-shaped wing, delta designs are a very low aspect ratio wing used in supersonic aircraft. Delta wings are efficient in all phases of flight, subsonic, transonic, and supersonic, and offers a large surface area which improves maneuverability and reduces wing load. Delta wings are also structurally sound, possess a large volume for fuel storage, and are simple to manufacture and maintain. However, delta wings create lots of drag, and at low speed operations they force a high angle of attack because of vortices creating lift, which makes take-offs and landings challenging.

Variable sweep:

These designs feature wings that are mounted on mechanical hinges that let them alter their profile mid-flight that can sweep the wing back and forth. This lets the wings alter their profiles to be more suitable for low speed or high speed operations. However, these wings are very mechanically complex, and require lots of maintenance.

At Aerospace Unlimited, owned and operated by ASAP Semiconductor, we can help you find all the aircraft wing parts for the aerospace, civil aviation, and defense industries. We’re always available and ready to help you find all the parts and equipment you need, 24/7-365. For a quick and competitive quote, email us at sales@aerospaceunlimited.com or call us at 1412-212-0606.


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RC helicopters have been a fairly popular hobby for many for a long time. They allow many to simulate what it is like to fly a real helicopter and can provide much enjoyment. While the complexities of an RC helicopter may be much less than their real counterpart, there are similar components and controls. For the purpose of an RC helicopter, there are five main components which are the main and tail rotors, swashplates, cyclical control, and collective control.

Attached to the fuselage, the main rotor consists of two or more blades and is what enables the lifting power of the RC helicopter. This amount of lift is dependant on the inclination angle of the blades, as well as their velocity. Often, the RPM of the main rotor ranges anywhere from 1500-3000. By increasing the main rotor’s pitch, increased push and lift force can be achieved. The tail rotor is also important as it is what keeps the helicopter from spinning around in circles due to the force of the main rotor. By increasing or decreasing the thrust of the tail rotor, one can then steer the helicopter.

The swashplates are important as they are what translate the flight control input for the main rotor of the RC helicopter. A swashplate consists of two discs, one that is stationary and another that is moving. With cyclical controls, the swashplate can be tilted in any direction, as well as up and down through the use of collective controls.

Cyclical control allows for the helicopter to have 360 degree movement through the tilting of the oscillating plate and separately elevating the rotor pitch. The helicopter will begin to tip towards the direction of the side that has the lowest altitude. Collective control, on the other hand, changes the rotor blade pitch in unison to the same degree. The RC helicopter’s radio transmitter is able to control and translate the cyclic and collective movements.

At Aerospace Unlimited, owned and operated by ASAP Semiconductor, we can help you find helicopter parts you need, new or obsolete. As a premier supplier of parts for the aerospace, civil aviation, and defense industries, we're always available and ready to help you find all the parts and equipment you need, 24/7x365. For a quick and competitive quote, email us at sales@aerospaceunlimited.com or call us at +1-412-212-0606.


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A helicopter is a type of rotary aircraft in which thrust and lift are achieved through the use of spinning rotors. This allows the aircraft to take off and land vertically and hover at a fixed altitude. Despite helicopters being far smaller than most airplanes, the rapidly-spinning rotors make it very hard to control. Each helicopter is made of five main parts: the cockpit, main rotor, tail rotor, landing gear, and engine. This blog will explain each of the five main parts in further detail.

The cockpit is the brain of the helicopter. It serves as the central control unit and determines all the activity of the helicopter. The pilot and co-pilot reside in the cockpit, however some helicopters do not require two people to control. The four most important control the pilot uses in the cockpit are the cyclic, collective, anti-torque pedals, and throttle.

Just as the cockpit is the brain of a helicopter, the main rotor is the heart. It is perhaps the single most important component of the helicopter. The main rotor allows the pilot to control which way the helicopter turns, changes altitude, and moves laterally. The pilot commands the rotor with the cockpit controls linked to the swash plate assembly. The tail rotor is found at the rear end of a helicopter and is necessary to counteract the torque caused by the main rotor. If the tail rotor were not present, the aircraft would spin in the inverse direction of the main rotor.

Landing gear comes in a variety of types but skids and wheels are the most common. Floats, pontoons, and bear paws are also used. Bear paws are an attachment to skids used when the helicopter is landing off airport on unstable terrain providing more stability. The two types of helicopter engines are reciprocating and turbine. Reciprocating engines use pistons to convert pressure into motion thereby creating power. Turbine engines create power by mixing compressed air with fuel to create high-speed gas to turn the turbine blades.

At Aerospace Unlimited, owned and operated by ASAP Semiconductor, we can help you find all the unique parts for helicopters as well as the aerospace, civil aviation, and defense industries as a whole. We’re always available and ready to help you find all the parts and equipment you need, 24/7-365. For a quick and competitive quote, email us at sales@aerospaceunlimited.com or call us at 412-212-0606.


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A rough look at history will show you that it took humanity more than 10,000 years to invent flying machinery. Yet it was only 66 years later in 1969 that humanity accomplished aeronautical aviation and landed a human on the moon. This goes to show that the more we discover and create, the faster it enables our world to grow. You need only look at these recent years to see that technology is advancing at a rapid pace and the next years are sure to unveil amazing advancements in flight. Read on below for some new concepts emerging in the aviation industry.

Electric Aircrafts

Among the most exciting news to come out in aviation is the optimistic potential for aircraft to be powered by electricity. Currently, airplanes are being designed to use exclusively electricity when on the ground. Professionals are working soon to extend this feat into the air. Having electrical aircrafts replace fuel running airplanes could greatly benefit our environmental health by reducing fuel consumption, as well as air and ground pollution. An electric aircraft would also emit little if any noise, meaning communities near airports could potentially see value rise.

Automation

Smart technology and machine learning have made great strides in the last five years and now that self driving cars have been released into the market, it’s very possible that self driving aircraft will become a standard in the coming years. Remote controlled aircraft is currently being used, but tests with self learning machinery have proven that the latter shows less likeliness of collisions.

Improved Aircraft Experience

Part of what has improved aircraft experience is the increased connectivity that there now is between passenger and cabin crew. While the first years of commercial flight saw passengers having to flag down the newest steward or stewardess, these recent years now have cabin crew and passengers connected via touch screen computers. Some experts speculate that the rise of automation may even present opportunities for the pilot crew to connect with the passengers.

At Aerospace Unlimited, owned and operated by ASAP Semiconductor, we can help you find all the unique parts for the aerospace, civil aviation, and defense industries. We’re always available and ready to help you find all the parts and equipment you need, 24/7-365. For a quick and competitive quote, email us at sales@aerospaceunlimited.com or call us at 1-412-212-0606.


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Every airport, from the largest international to the smallest regional, needs ground service equipment to support and operate fleets of aircraft flying in and out of it. Ground service equipment needs to be regulated, however, so that crews always know what they are dealing with, no matter where in the world they are. Over four decades, standards for GSE have evolved, culminating in the international standards that are applied worldwide.

The ISO TC20/SC9, air cargo and ground equipment subcommittee was started in the late 1960s to define the standards for the new and developing types of GSE needed to service new wide-body commercial aircraft like the Boeing 747. This task is never truly completed, as there are always new generations of aircraft with new generations of ground service equipment accompanying them. Over the years, the ISO TC20/SC9 has had to respond to containers and aircraft towing, the introduction of regional commercial aircraft, and even the enormous A380 produced by Airbus, the first aircraft with full length double-deck.

Significant market changes have occurred over the years as well. Sub-contracting has led to more and more service providers, while airlines have dropped their own specifications for purchasing equipment and begun to buy off-the-shelf equipment instead. This has forced ISO standards to be applied at the design stage by equipment manufacturers instead. Airborne equipment like unit load devices have needed to be regulated to ensure they comply with civil aviation regulations, while ground service equipment TC20/SC9 standards have had to be expressed in terms of function and performance requirements to leave the wide variety of technical designs open.

Recent TC20/SC9 projects have involved the advances in aircraft de-icing technologies, replacing forty year old criteria used to certify air cargo ULDs with a more streamlined and modernized document, and updating the regulations and standards for baggage handling to improve the health and safety of workers involved. This last example is part of a major trend recently of trying to improve human resources and reducing the overall cost to operators, which are heavily burdened by the cost of work accidents and professional disabilities. Work interruptions, early retirements due to disability, and health insurance costs can be ruinously expensive for both workers and employers, a cost that can be lowered with proper regulations and standards.

Future challenges that the TC20/SC9 program might face include performance standards for passive and active aircraft interface protection systems that shield aircraft from damage from GSE due to collisions, better ground electrical supply requirements, improved function and safety requirements for aircraft bulk loading systems (ABLS), higher standards for safety in dispatch towing, and more.

At Aerospace Unlimited, owned and operated by ASAP Semiconductor, we can help you find all the ground service equipment for the aerospace, civil aviation, and defense industries. We’re always available and ready to help you find all the parts and equipment you need, 24/7-365. For a quick and competitive quote, email us at sales@aerospaceunlimited.com or call us at 1-412-212-0606.


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The NSN system can be dated back to the WWII era when the military would use a specific component that had several different names depending on who supplied or manufactured the component. This made it difficult for the military to locate suppliers, or share items between the different organizational branches. An item could be in short supply in one location, but in surplus in another. To overcome this sourcing issue, the Department of Defense created the NSN system. National Stock Numbers or NSNs, are 13-digit serial numbers assigned to all standardized items within the federal supply chain. All components that are used by the U.S Department of Defense are required to have an NSN, the purpose of which is to provide a standardized naming of components.

Also known as NATO stock numbers, NSNs are recognized by all NATO countries. The NSN can be further broken down into smaller subcategories, each providing individual information about the component. To begin, the first four digits of the NSN are known as the Federal Supply Classification Group. The FSCG determines which of the 645 subclasses an item belongs to. The FSCG is further split into the Federal Supply Group (FSG) and the Federal Supply Classification (FSC). The FSG is made up of the first two digits of the NSN which determines which of the 78 groups an item belongs to. The second 2 digits make up the FSC, which determines the subclass an item belongs to. In the aerospace industry a key federal supply group is FSG 15: Aircraft and Airframe Structural Components. The remaining 9 digits are made up of the 2-digit country identifier followed by the 7 National Item Identification Number (NIIN). The US for example, has the country identifier 00.

A manufacturer can not simply request an NSN. An item must first be formally recognized by one of the following bodies; Military service, NATO country, federal or civil agency, or various contractor support weapon systems. Once they have a specific need for the specific part, the details are then sent over to the DLA for assignment. There are 10s of millions of items with NSNs. They aren’t just assigned to one component either. In fact, entire systems are assigned their own NSN. Aircraft turbine engine have one NSN, while the smaller components of the system have their own. The purpose of this system is to help expedite maintenance and repair programs. To help manage the vast amount of NSNs, each NSN is assigned an item manager, who monitors the stock and supply of the NSN, ensuring that it is readily available military purposes.

Due to the sheer amount of NSNs, the DLA relies on suppliers to source and stock NSNs for various applications. Aerospace Unlimited, owned and operated ASAP Semiconductor, is a premier supplier of NSNs for the aerospace and defense industries. Our large inventory is conveniently listed on our website under various categories such as Federal Supply Groups, CAGE codes, and the manufacturers. Our team of dedicated staff can help find the exact NSN that you need. Visit our website, https://www.aerospaceunlimited.com/, or call us at +1-412-212-0606 to source NSNs today.


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Exciting news from Honeywell about the iconic T55 turboshaft engine surfaced in mid-April. A pair of T55 engines powered a Sikorsky-Boeing SB-1 DEFIANT in a Vertical Lift demonstration intending to revolutionize the U.S. Army Aviation branch.

 
This new and improved engine has been in the final stages of development and will be showcasing new technology to increase reliability, availability ,and decrease operational costs. John Russo, senior product director at Honeywell, claims it is a new era for T55 engines. He told reporters at a press release that this new aircraft engine will lower fuel burn while simultaneously increasing aircraft load and flight range. This is exciting for manufacturers and civilians alike.
 
The T55 has already been used in the U.S. Army’s Chinook helicopters for some time now, but this latest advancement will take the Army into a new modernized generation of technology and infrastructure. In addition to all the aforementioned benefits to this engine, there is also a downstream result of greater overall horsepower. The T55 can be incorporated by a kit at overhaul by Honeywell or the Army location in Corpus Christi, Texas or as a new production, forward fit option.
 
Honeywell is in a great position. Testing will continue on the DEFIANT as the U.S. Army weighs their decision on its future Vertical Lift platform. Honeywell will now offer a common, but equally extraordinary, engine for both the Chinook helicopter and the aircraft eventually chosen by the Vertical Lift procurement team.
 
John Russo adds that the T55 engine is now brought up to the latest certification standards to set a long-term growth pattern for power increases, decreased fuel needs, and airframe weight increases. John Russo finishes by saying that he looks forward to powering many more flights in the years to come.
 
At Aerospace Unlimited,we help you find all Honeywell aircraft parts for the aerospace, civil aviation, and defense industries, we’re always available and ready to help you find all the parts and equipment you need, 24/7x365. For a quick and competitive quote, email us at salea@aerospaceunlimited.com or call us at 1-412-212-0606.

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After a plane has been decommissioned it ends up in a dusty parking lot known as a “boneyard.” A boneyard is a massive field that houses aircraft that can no longer fly, where the parts that are still functioning are recycled, or often times, resold. A plane that has been deemed too old to fly can still have a large amount of value. These boneyards may not be spectacular, but they are a heavy contributor into the industry that comprises an “after life” ecosystem. One that spans from hedge funds to specialized recycling firms.  

 
Permanently retired aircraft are slowly but surely dismantled overtime. Their decommissioning fluctuates with the demand for working spare parts. The vessels are inspected for key components that can still serve a purpose, and when there’s nothing left, the remains are melted down for scrap metal. Some sections of the fuselage may be removed and used as training facilities for flight crew, firefighters, or other educational purposes. Breaking down an aircraft requires specialized skills and training—combined with modern technology—to gather, separate, and recycle the different alloys, plastics, and fluids. Often times the aircraft is not recycled, instead it is simply left to rust. Once the plane has been de-registered, it is classed as waste and has to be processed in compliance with environmental regulations. 
 
The amount of parts that can be reused depends on the age of the aircraft. A fairly new A320 aircraft can have as many as 1,200 reusable aircraft components, although most of the value lies in the engine. Their turbines contain rotating blades that must be changed out on a regular basis to stay in compliance with aircraft regulations. Swapping out these blades with used parts can cut repair costs in half. Secondhand landing gear can also fetch a hefty price ($300,00). Approximately $2.5 billion worth of salvaged and recycled parts entered the market between 2009 and 2011. These components can be sold overseas to countries that have different regulatory standards on which parts are still functional. Airlines can purchase spare parts through a third-party reseller, from a government marketplace, or even on eBay. Almost every part of an airplane can be recycled for use in newer planes.
 
The world’s largest aircraft boneyard (AMARG) is located in Arizona and is estimated to hold more than $32 billion worth of outdated planes, including government aircraft. The arid climate in this state slows down the rusting process, prolonging the afterlife of the aircraft. The inventory consists of retired commercial carriers to nuclear capable B-52 bombers, and everything in between. More than 80% of the planes stored here are used for spare parts. When a plane arrives in AMARG it is thoroughly washed to remove any salt on the exterior. Technicians then drain the fuel tanks, cover the tires, and remove any potentially explosive devices (guns or ejection seat activators). They then paint the top of the plane white to deflect the sun’s rays and signify an inoperable aircraft.
 
The life of an aircraft doesn’t end when it is decommissioned. It lives on in the boneyards of the world, providing parts to upgraded versions of themselves and enabling a new market to exist.
 
At Aerospace Unlimited, owned and operated by ASAP Semiconductor, we can help you find all the salvaged aircraft parts for the aerospace, civil aviation, and defense industries. We’re always available and ready to help you find all the parts and equipment you need, 24/7-365. For a quick and competitive quote, email us at sales@aerospaceunlimited.com or call us at +1-412-212-0606.


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Aching legs, weird humming noises, squeezing past other people to get to the restroom— these discomforts describe the features of a bad aircraft seat, and rest assured, we’ve all been there. So, where is the best place to sit on an airplane? Is it worth it to pay for your seat, or to sit by your device 24 hours after booking your flight to get that “A” boarding pass? We’ll lay out all the facts using the example of a widebody aircraft so that you can make your decision with ease.

 
Let’s tackle what region of the cabin to sit in. Which is best— front, middle, or back of the aircraft? If you’re particular about noise, the front of the cabin is your best choice. On average it is quieter than the rest of the plane, and sound from the engines is most diffused towards the front. This area is also less affected by general turbulence. Pro tip, if you’re a first-time flyer or you are bringing one, sit up here.
 
Sitting in emergency seats is the best option for anyone looking for more leg room, but always be prepared to handle the responsibilities this seat may require. Exit seats with more space are located in the middle of a wide body aircraft. Last but certainly not least to some, for a cool social media photo, sit in the middle of the aircraft. You’ll have a better chance of that picturesque view of the aircraft wing.
 
When you’re looking for privacy, or the chance of an empty seat next to you, sit in the back. Most airlines load the aircraft front to back, so your best chance of available seats and overhead bins is in the rear of the aircraft. This will also give you quick access to lavatories, and usually faster flight attendant service. Now, is there really that much of a difference between a window, middle or aisle seat? Let’s dive into the specifics.
 
 If you are in a rush for one reason or another, need to get up frequently, or crave more leg room, the aisle seat is your best choice. Psychologically, it’s also better for new flyers, and anxious flyers, to sit in the aisle seat. The accessibility can help reduce general anxieties.
 
Middle seats are generally the least preferred seat on an aircraft due to their limited accessibility. However, this choice is ideal if you are saving a seat for someone, or if you are bringing a child on board. You can ensure a saved seat beside you, and people in a group are less likely to try and sit in your row. It is also the second-best choice if you know you’ll need to have regular access to the bathroom.   
 
Window seats are ideal if you’re wanting to sleep undisturbed. Flight attendants and passengers are less likely to bump you as they pass by, and noise is reduced in this area. However, shoulder room is limited near the window, due to the curvature of the airframe. If you need extra space, opt for the aisle seat instead.
 
At Aerospace Unlimited, owned and operated by ASAP Semiconductor, we can help you find the aircraft parts you need, new or obsolete. As a trusted ISO 9001:2015 certified and FAA AC-0056B accredited company, we’re committed to quality and ready to help you 24/7x365. For a quick and competitive quote, email us at sales@aerospaceunlimited.com or call us at +1-412-212-0606.


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Have you ever wondered why some aircraft have a structure at the end of the wing that stick up? They may seem counterintuitive when comparing it to the lift to the force produced by a vertical wing. However, they make a lot more sense than you think. These wing structures reduce weight and drag, and increase lift and efficiency. They were created after fuel costs started skyrocketing in the 1970s and have been one of the most effective technologies to increase fuel-efficiency since.

 
Aircraft Wings lets are structural components added to the tip of the wing— they reduce wingtip vortices. Wingtip vortices are produced at the tip of the wing when the high-pressure air from the bottom of the wing meets the lower pressure air at the top. This air flows behind the flight path and can be detrimental to other aircraft that are following— they are strong enough to flip some aircraft.
 
Winglets reduce drag; they increase the aspect ratio of the wing without adding as much weight as an expansion. One benefit to having a winglet over a longer wingspan is that increasing the span lowers lift-induced drag, but increases parasitic drag. Winglets also increase lift. The magnitude and orientation of the lift force generated by the winglet are determined by the angle at which the winglets’ airfoils diverge from the relative wind direction. Generating more lift without increasing weight or drag means that winglets result in greater fuel efficiency, lower CO2 emissions, and a lower cost for airlines.
 
With the benefits that winglets provide, it’s difficult to understand why there are some aircraft that don’t have them. While it’s easier and safer to add a wing extension, adding a winglet can be tricky. Although aircraft can be fitted with winglets, many manufacturers are integrating winglets into the original design. This increases safety and efficiency.
 
At Aerospace Unlimited, owned and operated by ASAP Semiconductor, we can help you find all the aircraft parts you need, new or obsolete. As a premier supplier of parts for the aerospace, civil aviation, and defense industries, we’re always available and ready to help you find all the parts and equipment you need, 24/7x365. For a quick and competitive quote, email us at sales@aerospaceunlimited.com or call us at 1-412-212-0606.


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“Aircraft engine failure” is one of the most unsettling phrases in the aviation community. Failures of aircraft engine can be caused by a multitude of different parts malfunctions, and/or pilot error. The statistics on the frequency of aircraft engine failures are sparse and convoluted. However, for commercial air travel, most modern twin engine passenger jets are designed to function safely even if one engine fails. Engine failure as a result of part malfunction seems to differ between the type of engine. So, let’s take a look at an industry standard—turbine engine failure.

 
Statistically, the most immediate problem that ensues as a result of engine failure in a turbine engine is loss of thrust. Thrust propels the plane forward consistently at a predetermined altitude. This is part of achieving what the pilot on a commercial aircraft announces as “cruising altitude”. Without thrust, the plane starts to lose altitude. The speed at which this happens depends on the damage to flight control surfaces. If the aircraft wings, tail plane, or ram air turbine are damaged, engine failure can quickly become a more serious problem. A pilot will need to glide the aircraft to safety. Aircraft pilots should have completed thorough training to know how to calculate the altitude and angle in which they can bring the plane to safety, and where to do so. Due to the dual engine system in a jet aircraft, only a record of 3 engine failures resulting in gliding have occurred in the last decade.
 
Aircraft maintenance and regular inspections are integral to ensuring that aircraft parts are not vulnerable or damaged in order to prevent engine failure. Reported aircraft engine failures in the last fifty years total under 10— and they are typically caused by poor decisions or judgment from the pilot and/or crew. Extreme weather events leading to malfunctions are also common sources for engine failure, so scheduling regular inspections of parts is essential as a preventative measure to avoid engine failure on your aircraft.
 
At Aerospace Unlimited, owned and operated by ASAP Semiconductor, we can help you find all the Pratt & Whitney aircraft parts and aircraft engine parts assemblies you need, new or obsolete. As a premier supplier of parts for the aerospace, civil aviation, and defense industries, we’re always available and ready to help you find all the parts and equipment you need, 24/7x365. For a quick and competitive quote, email us at sales@aerospaceunlimited.com or call us at +1-412-212-0606.


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A printed circuit board electronically and mechanically connects electrical components using special conductive tracks. These features are etched into copper and laminated onto or in between sheet layers of nonconductive substrates. Printed circuit board layouts are extremely important in circuit design processes because the layout determines how a circuit will work— including its reliability and performance. 


There are several computer development programs that aid with printed circuit board designs, streamlining the design process. These types of programs increase the ease of the design process not just for experts, but also for students. Previously, the design was created using tape and a master drawing sheet, a technique that is long gone. Software for printed circuit boards vary in function and must be selected based on the requirements of the circuit board.

The first step in creating a design for a printed circuit board is to capture the schematic of the circuit. This can be done by using a special tool included in your package or by purchasing an external package whose output can be expressed and formatted to match. This creates a “netlist” which allows for interconnectivity between circuit nodes, electrical pins and nets. Before a netlist is created, it is imperative to know where to place the components to confirm circuitry. Roughly knowing the placement of all components beforehand will make it easier to determine the required space between layers for future electrical placements. Once all placements are placed in the correct position, routing will take place. The connections will need to be routed to the components on all layers. Routing is the most complicated process of printed circuit board design.  This design will be used several times during the manufacturing process.

Aerospace Unlimited, owned and operated by ASAP Semiconductor, should always be your first and only stop for all your circuit board needs.  Aerospace Unlimited is a premier supplier of printed circuit board assembly parts. Whether new, old, or hard-to-find, we can help you find all the parts you need. Aerospace Unlimited has a wide selection of parts to choose from and is fully equipped with a friendly and knowledgeable staff, and we will always help you find what you’re looking for, 24/7x365. If you’re interested in a quick and competitive quote, email us at sales@aerospaceunlimited.com or call us at +1-412-212-0606.


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The Rolls Royce Trent 500 engine is a complex piece of machinery that is the operating force behind Airbus’ A340, -500, and -600.  Its design was based off the RB211 line of three-shaft engines, which has consistently proven to be a reliable engine model.


The Trent 500 is Rolls Royce’s profit generator because it allows for a better payload – thanks in part to its lightweight design and high levels of fuel efficiency.  This engine also boasts outstanding in-service margins, allowing for longer lengths of time between maintenance and lower repair costs.
Some key features of the Trent 500:

  • 53K or 56K pound take-off thrust
  • Single crystal high-pressure turbine blades
  • 97.4” wide-chord fan diameter, made of lightweight titanium – protects against any damage from foreign objects
  • Tiled Phase 5 combustor – provides the lowest levels of pollution and noise       
So how do aircraft engines work?  They start by pulling air into the front of the aircraft via a large blade fan.  Next, a compressor raises the air pressure and internal blades start spinning and squeezing the air.  Once compressed, the air is mixed with fuel and a spark lights the mixture, shooting jets of burning gas out the back and thrusting the aircraft forward.  The hot air then passes through the turbine, causing the compressor to spin.  Although this is a very simplified explanation, this is the basis of how all aircraft engines work.

Within the engine, there’s something called an integrated drive generator (IDG).  This component connects to the aircraft gearbox and converts the shaft power into constant frequency electrical power.  Inside the Trent 500, there are four IDGs that work together to meet the A340’s level of power requirements.  These are important because they act as a governor, keeping the aircraft at a stabilized speed.

Aerospace Unlimited, owned and operated by ASAP Semiconductor, is an online distributor of aircraft engines and engine-related components, with aircraft repair capabilities.  With a continuously increasing inventory, you can be sure Aerospace Unlimited will have everything you need and more.  Aerospace Unlimited is known for finding cost-effective solutions for hard-to-find aircraft parts. We will ensure all your needs are addressed in a timely and professional manner.  For a quote, reach out to our main office by phone: +1-412-212-0606 or by email: sales@aerospaceunlimited.com.

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The Airbus Group A380 production is a massive undertaking, assembled in Jean Luc Lagardere Plant, which is in at Toulouse Blagnac Airport located in France. The parts are shipped from all over Europe to be assembles at the plant and sent for orders. The aircraft wings are made in Wales, the rear fuselage is made in Hamburg along with the vertical tail fin, the forward and center fuselage are made in France, the horizontal tail is made in Spain.


The aircraft has over 4 million parts made by 1500 companies from more than 30 countries around the world. These parts are massive components and is difficult to transport. However, this is how it is done. The first order was made by Singapore airlines in 2007, and since then they have made over 200 aircraft.

One of the most amazing things about the Airbus is that they have their own army of ships to ship all of these components to be assembled. 3 boats to be exact and are even customized to their needs for transporting aircraft parts. Six of the major components of the aircraft are transported by boat, only one is done by aircraft, the vertical tailfin inside a Airbus A300-600ST otherwise known as the Beluga. This plane still isn’t large enough to transport the other 6 major parts. These boats make a 8 day journey travelling 335 kilometers through the rivers in Europe. Once the parts are delivered by boat, they need to hit the road, they only travel at night when traffic is low due to the massive size of the parts and the truck that moves them. One of the most amazing things that a road was built for these transports, so that the cargo transport isn’t disturbing towns people in rural France.

Aerospace Unlimited owned and operated by ASAP Semiconductor, should always be your first and only stop for all your hard to find fuselage parts, and aviation fasteners. Aerospace Unlimited is the premier supplier of aerospace components, whether new, old or hard to find, we can help you locate it. Aerospace Unlimited has a wide selection of parts to choose from and is fully equipped with a friendly staff, so you can always find what you’re looking for, at all hours of the day. If you’re interested in obtaining a quote, contact the sales department at www.aerospaceunlimited.com or call +1-412-212-0606.


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Owners and operators of the Bombardier Challenger 300 and 600 series business jets, along with the new Challenger 350 and 650 aircraft, may have the pleasure of looking forward to Gogo AVACE L5 4G Wi-Fi on these aircrafts. The availability of this wi-fi connectivity is due to a recent collaboration between Bombardier (located in Montreal), and Duncan Aviation (located in Lincoln, Nebraska). Both companies were recent recipients of STC (Supplemental Type Certificates) for the Gogo system on the 360 and 650 aircrafts, as well as a component option for in-service 300 and 600 aircraft.


Both Bombardier and Duncan Aviation will undergo retrofit installations at Bombardier’s world-renown, 5 FAA Diamond award winning centers located in North America, as well at Duncan Aviation’s 3 MRO (maintenance repair, and overhaul) locations. As a support to the government, service providers, and business operators, Duncan Aviation provides service that includes engine maintenance, major cockpit and cabin retrofits, airframe inspections and more.

On newer Challenger aircrafts, the Gogo system will work in accordance with Bombardier’s HD CMS which is labeled as providing the best audio experience for passengers. The system also provides a broader range of cabin features that Bombardier explains will allow for passengers to access data, entertainment, CMS services and more, in an easer manner. Promoted as being three times quicker than 3G networks and designed in direct regards to business aircraft, the Gogo Biz 4G network require more than two-hundred and fifty towards that can provide connectivity across the United States and parts of Canada.

Bombardier and Duncan Aviation have confirmed the completed installation of the Gogo Avance L5 on 300 and 605 Challenger aircrafts. The option for retrofit is available for the 350, 604, and 650 aircraft. Brad Nolen, vice president of Bombardier Business Aircraft, shares Bombardier’s pride and joy as a leader in cabin connectivity by offering the 4g Wi-Fi system on new and in-service aircrafts.

Aerospace Unlimited, an ASAP Semiconductor owned website, was developed to further simplify the procurement process in the aviation industry. Bombardier, the well renown aviation parts manufacturer, is just one of the many thousands of manufacturers supplied by Aerospace Unlimited. Whether it is supplying Bombardier Aircraft parts or parts for civilian or military aviation or more, Aerospace Unlimited will allow for customer’s to secure parts quickly and with ease.


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Garmin is a premier GPS technology firm headquartered out of Olathe, Kansas.  Garmin believes safety is paramount when operating Part 27 helicopters.  Garmin is constantly innovating and providing better solutions for helicopter pilots and users.  Garmin Aviation has years of experience specializing in display components and helicopter parts.  Technology is constantly evolving and being able to integrate new Garmin aviation parts into existing airframes is a core task of Garmin.  The new G3000H seamlessly allows the operator to have Helicopter Synthetic Vision Technology(HSVT), Hover Display, Connext, Telligence Voice Command, HTAWS, Helicopter route charts, Reduced Protection, Wire Aware, HSI mapping, Visual approach, Terran profile view, ADS-B IN/Out.


With the upgraded Garmin display components-the user has access to mapping, terrain profile view, and routes.  By providing this information in a seamless easy-to-use system, the operator can fly with confidence and enhance safety and assurance to all parties involved with helicopter operations.  Using new technology effectively and with minimal error, the Garmin G3000H is a simply designed with less complications, mitigating the risks of malfunction.  It is imperative that Garmin helicopter parts are reliable and user-friendly. 

Garmin aviation parts provides the best quality products when it comes to helicopter parts and display components.  The new Garmin G3000H also allows for NVG-compatibility, which makes better situational awareness and improve decision-making when flying in night conditions.  Ultimately, Garmin produces products for a wide range of users, whether it is a frequent flyer on a business trip or weekend recreational flights, customers can trust Garmin aviation parts to do the job. 

Aerospace Unlimited, owned and operated by ASAP Semiconductor, should always be your first and only stop for all your hard to find and urgent Garmin aviation part types. Aerospace Unlimited is the premier supplier of Garmin helicopter parts, whether new, old or hard to find, they can help you locate it. We have a wide selection of aircraft parts to choose from and is fully equipped with a friendly staff, so you can always find what you’re looking for, at all hours of the day. If you’re interested in obtaining a quote, contact the sales department at www.aerospaceunlimited.com or call +1-412-212-0606.


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