Wingboxes are an integral part of many fixed-wing aircraft, wherein they form the structural center of aircraft wings while simultaneously allowing for the use of other wing parts, such as flaps and wingtips. Serving as the primary load-carrying structure in aircraft, the wingbox runs along the wings and into the fuselage. To better understand these complex devices, this blog will cover five facts about wingboxes you may not be familiar with.

1. One of the Strongest Parts of Aircraft

The wingbox is one of the most robust parts of an aircraft and is utilized as the mounting surface for the wings. As such, wingboxes must have the capacity to withstand various loads and stressors which impact the wings. More than that, they contribute to the structural soundness of aircraft.

2. Made of Carbon Fiber

Early versions of wingboxes were made of stainless steel, but recently, these essential aerospace components are being composed of carbon fiber. In fact, most wingboxes are made of such a material because of its strength-to-weight ratio. Stainless steel, on the other hand, is strong, but outweighs its carbon fiber counterpart. With this in mind, carbon fiber wingboxes have risen in popularity.

3. Attaches to Landing Gear

You may be surprised to learn that landing gear is often attached to the wingbox. While the wings are generally attached to the sides of the wingbox, the landing gear may also be attached to the underside of the wingbox as well. Furthermore, the wingbox is typically installed in the rear section of the fuselage, making it a perfect mount point for landing gear.

4. Not Like Box Spars

Wingboxes are often conflated with box spars, but they are not the same. Instead, boxspars are box-shaped skeletal frames for wings. In contrast, wingboxes are box-shaped structural units where wings, landing gear, and other aircraft components can be attached. Beyond the fact that all aircraft are equipped with such devices, wingboxes and box spars are completely different.

5. Available as a Single Piece

Airbus, the European multinational aerospace corporation, has recently developed a single-piece wingbox made entirely of carbon fiber. Of the countless aerospace manufacturers in existence today, Airbus is leading the way in terms of wingbox design with their unveiling of this single-piece wingbox in 2017. With only a single piece, Airbus claims that this new carbon-fiber wingbox design costs 20% less to manufacture.

Conclusion

Aerospace Unlimited is a leading distributor of aircraft parts and components, including wingboxes, box spars, landing gear, GSE, and more. With over 2 billion new, used, obsolete, and hard-to-find options in our wide-ranging inventory, customers can fulfill their part requirements with ease. Backed by rapid lead times and unbeatable cost savings, the experts at Aerospace Unlimited ensure you get exactly what you require at low price points. As our supply chain network stretches across the United States, Canada, and the United Kingdom, even our most remote customers have an opportunity to purchase from us. More than that, our network of distributors allows us to offer expedited shipping services on select in-stock products to domestic and international customers alike.

Owned and operated by ASAP Semiconductor, we leverage our market expertise and purchasing power to provide a seamless procurement process from beginning to end. Get started today by requesting a quote on any desired item which can be accessed through our Instant RFQ service. Within 15 minutes of submitting a completed form, a dedicated representative will reach out with a sourcing solution that keeps your needs in mind. We only ask that you include as many of your part requirements as possible in the form. For additional questions, call or email us today; we are available 24/7x365!


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Aerodynamics is the study of airflow and how it affects objects in motion. It is a vital component of aviation, as aircraft must be designed to create enough lift while minimizing drag. Several different aerodynamic devices can be used on aircraft, each with its own benefits and drawbacks.

Airflow is a critical component in the operation of any aerodynamic device, and different types of aerodynamic devices use airflow to improve the aircraft's performance. Without proper airflow, an aerodynamic device will not function as intended. For example, wings are designed to use airflow to generate lift, while strakes are another aircraft device used to affect airflow to create drag.

Regarding strakes, they are a type of aerodynamic device used to improve airflow around a vehicle or object. They are typically made of metal or plastic and are attached to the fuselage to help reduce drag and increase fuel efficiency. Alongside improving the airflow around an aircraft, strakes also bolster the overall stability of the aircraft. Furthermore, there are many different types that can be used which have their own unique benefits.

Different Types of Strakes

Below we will discuss the most common types of strakes that may be found on an aircraft, as well as the unique benefits and drawbacks of each:

Nose strakes: Nose strakes are installed at the front of aircraft along the leading edge of the nose to help improve airflow by reducing drag over the aircraft and promoting stability. They can be used on both civilian and military aircraft, and they are very effective in improving performance.

Wing strakes: As their name states, wing strakes are designed to be attached to the wings of an aircraft to improve airflow over the wings and increase lift and drag. Through leading edge suction while at a high angle of attack, wing strakes can be used to generate additional vortex lift.

Nacelle strakes: Nacelle strakes are used to improve airflow around the nacelle of an aircraft. By reducing turbulence and drag, nacelle strakes can also enhance the overall performance and efficiency of aircraft engines when in flight. They are typically made from a lightweight material, such as carbon fiber, and can be installed on either the inboard or outboard side of the nacelle.

The Difference Between Strakes and Winglets

Winglets are another type of flight device that is similar in appearance to strakes, and the two are often conflated as a result. As they perform different roles and are placed in separate areas, it is crucial that one understands their difference. While both devices serve to improve airflow around the aircraft and its surfaces, winglets are only used on the wings of the vehicle while strakes may be situated in a variety of areas. Additionally, while strakes bolster lift through the increase of airflow around the aircraft, winglets are more focused on affecting drag for the sake of fuel efficiency and enhanced control. While some aircraft may have winglets and strakes features for their design, other models may only have one or the other. Generally, the presence of either device will come down to the particular needs of the aircraft and the types of operations that it will undertake.

Conclusion

Aircraft are equipped with strakes to help improve their aerodynamic performance, and they play an essential role in promoting vehicle safety, stability, and efficiency If you require any aviation component to satisfy your operational needs, Aerospace Unlimited Services offers an inventory of over 2 billion aerospace, defense, and electronic products ready for immediate procural. To get started on the purchasing process, simply fill out an Instant RFQ form as provided on our website. Within 15 minutes upon submission of a completed form, a dedicated account manager will respond back to you with a competitive quote for your comparisons 24/7x365. 


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Engines are complex apparatuses equipped with numerous components and assemblies that allow them to work optimally. One feature in particular is called the air entrance, and it is designed to conduct incoming air to the compressor with a minimum energy loss, ensuring that air flow is free of turbulence. To achieve such ends, proper inlet design contributes significantly. It improves aircraft performance by increasing the ratio of compressor discharge pressure to duct inlet pressure.

Also called the compressor pressure ratio, this ratio is the outlet pressure divided by the inlet pressure. The amount of air passing through the engine is based on three factors. First, the compressor speed, which is measured in RPMs, next, the forward speed, and lastly, the density of the ambient air.

The turbine inlet duct type is typically determined by the type of gas turbine engine. For example, a high-bypass turbofan engine inlet is different from a turboprop and turboshaft inlet. Generally, large gas turbine-powered aircraft are furnished with turbofan engines and the inlet is bolted to the front of the engine. Meanwhile, the engines are mounted on the wings, or nacelles, on the aft fuselage, and a select few will have them on the vertical fin.

On most modern turbofan engines, the fan is the first part that receives incoming air, thus icing protection must be incorporated. Deicing systems prevent chunks of ice from accumulating on the leading edge of the inlet and damaging the fan. At the same time, warm air is bled from the engine’s compressor and ducted via the inlet to prevent ice from forming. The inlet guide vanes can straighten airflow and contain some sound-reducing materials that absorb fan noise.

Turboprops and turboshafts can utilize an inlet screen to filter out ice and other debris from making their way into the engine, or a deflector vane and a heated inlet lip can also be used. Military aircraft travel at speeds above Mach 1, so the airflow should be maintained below Mach 1 since supersonic airflow in the engine can destroy it. By using convergent and divergent shaped ducts, the airflow can be controlled. Additionally, supersonic inlets can be used to slow the incoming engine air below Mach 1 before it enters the engine. In the next section, we will cover the most common inlet mounting styles and inlet types. 

Engine-Mounted Inlets

Many large commercial and military aircraft utilize wing-mounted engines. For the DC-10 and L-1011, a combination of wing-mounted and vertical stabilizer mounted engines are used. In these instances, the air inlet duct is positioned in front of the compressor and is mounted to the engine. Integral mounting of the inlet with an engine reduces air inlet length, which in turn increases operational efficiency. Some commercial aircraft and a majority of small business jets may also be fitted with aft fuselage mounted engines wherein the duct is short and is mounted directly to the engine.

Wing-Mounted Inlets

Aircraft with this mounting style feature air inlet ducts in the wing’s leading edge. Typically, wing-mounted inlet ducts are located near the wing root area.

Fuselage-Mounted Inlets

Engines mounted inside a fuselage will generally use air inlet ducts located near the front of the fuselage. While using this type of air inlet duct permits the aircraft manufacturer to construct a more aerodynamically efficient aircraft, the increased length of the inlet duct introduces some inefficiency. For single- and twin-engine aircraft, the air inlet ducts are mounted on the sides of the fuselage. This configuration allows the duct length to be shortened without adding excessive drag to the aircraft. Unfortunately, this arrangement causes some flight maneuvers to become imbalanced.

Subsonic Inlets

Consisting of a fixed geometric duct with a diameter that progressively increases from front to back, this shape works similar to a venturi in that as the intake air spreads out, the velocity of the air decreases and the pressure increases. This additional pressure contributes to engine efficiency once the aircraft has reached cruising speed. At this speed, the compressor reaches its optimal aerodynamic efficiency and produces the most compression for best fuel economy.

Supersonic Inlets

On supersonic aircraft, air inlet ducts have a fixed or variable geometric design with a diameter that progressively decreases and increases from front to back. This design is utilized to slow the incoming airflow to a subsonic speed before it reaches the compressor. Furthermore, many supersonic inlet ducts take advantage of a movable plug that changes the duct geometry as per flight conditions, allowing it to accommodate a wide range of speeds.

Conclusion

Aerospace Unlimited Services is a premier distributor of aircraft products, such as combustors, exhaust ducts, valves, inlets, and more. With an unparalleled inventory of top-quality items, customers can meet their operational deadlines with ease. Kickoff the procurement process with a competitive quote today and see how easily  Aerospace Unlimited Services can provide customized sourcing solutions for you!


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While many aspects of aircraft are becoming ever increasingly electrical, there are still countless mechanical devices that perform operations paramount to conducting a standard flight operation. For many aircraft, pulleys are a common mechanical device that is able to apply a pulling force through the use of a wheel and cable assembly. With a pulley, connected objects can be pulled and provided tension with ease, allowing for pilots to manage various important assemblies and systems. In this blog, we will discuss the most common aircraft applications that pulleys serve so that you may better understand their importance and uses.

Wing flaps are a staple of aircraft design, coming in the form of adjustable surfaces that are situated near the back edge of each wing structure. Through the actuation of wing flaps, pilots can govern the stalling speed of the aircraft. Additionally, wing flaps are also useful for minimizing the distance that an aircraft travels during takeoff or landing operations. As pilots need to be able to manage the wing flaps from the cockpit, a system of pulleys are used for raising and lowering such flight surfaces.

Ailerons are another wing-situated flight surface that pilots commonly use each flight, and they too can be managed with the use of pulley systems. While ailerons are also near the back edge of the aircraft’s wings, they are a bit closer to the tip. Additionally, there will often only be a single aileron surface on each wing, and they always adjust in opposite directions from one another. As such, if one aileron is raised with a pulley, the other is lowered. This allows for the aircraft to bank, and control is provided to the pilot in the cockpit through pulleys and more.

Landing gear is paramount for an aircraft’s ability to safely land and traverse on ground surfaces, yet they can often cause a high amount of drag when situated in the flow of air during flight. To mitigate drag, many aircraft feature the ability to deploy and retract landing gear, and this is often made possible through the use of pulleys. When an aircraft takes off from a runway and gains altitude, the pilot will activate the pullets to raise the landing gear system. Once it comes time to deploy the landing gear once again before touching down, the pulleys can be actuated again to safely lower the assembly.

While such examples constitute the primary uses of a pulley in the aviation sector, there are still many other uses for such devices. For instance, aircraft may use pulleys in numerous other areas to position components, provide travel adjustment, and enact tension. As many important controls are made possible through the use of pulleys, it is crucial that they are well maintained and inspected on a regular basis. If you are ever conducting maintenance and find that you need replacement parts to effectively service your aircraft, look no further than Aerospace Unlimited.

Aerospace Unlimited is a premier purchasing platform belonging to the ASAP Semiconductor family of websites, and we are your best solution for all the pulleys, drums, and other mechanical devices that you require for your aircraft. With our purchasing power and expertise, we can help you save time and money when sourcing top manufacturer parts and products. Even if you happen to be facing a time constraint, we can expedite the shipping process through the use of our expansive supply chain network. If you have any questions or concerns regarding our offerings or services, we encourage you to give us a call or email at your earliest convenience. At Aerospace Unlimited we are more than just a reputable distributor of parts; we are your strategic sourcing partner.


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An emergency locator transmitter (ELT) is an independent battery-powered transmitter that is activated by the excessive G-forces exerted during an aircraft crash. They have the ability to transmit a digital signal every 50 seconds on a frequency of 406.025 MHz at 5 watts for a minimum of 24 hours. This signal can be received anywhere in the world by satellites in the COSPAS-SARSAT satellite system.

There are two types of satellites, those of which are called low earth orbiting (LEOSATs) and geostationary satellites (GEOSATs). The transmitted signal is partially processed and stored in these satellites before being relayed to ground stations referred to as local user terminals (LUTs). At this stage, the LUTs further decipher the signal, and the appropriate search and rescue operations are notified via mission control centers (MCCs).

Since their widespread implementation on commercial aircraft in the 1970s, ELTs have become commonplace in the aviation realm. Today, ELTs must be installed in aircraft according to FAR 91.207. For the most part, this encompasses most general aviation aircraft that do not operate under Parts 135 or 121. Furthermore, ELTs must be annually inspected for proper installation, battery corrosion, operation of the controls and crash sensor, and the presence of an ample signal at the antenna.

Beyond such inspections, built-in test equipment enables testing without the transmission of an emergency signal. The next part of the inspection is visual, and it must be recorded in maintenance records and on the outside of the ELT. Nonetheless, technicians are still warned to not accidentally activate the ELT and transmit an emergency distress signal.

ELTs are usually installed near the tail of an aircraft while the built-in G-force sensor is aligned with the longitudinal axis of the aircraft. ELTs that are equipped with an automatic G-force activation sensor mounted in the aircraft are easily removable. They contain a portable antenna, allowing crash victims to leave the site and carry the operating ELT with them. Meanwhile, a flight deck mounted panel alerts the pilots when the ELT is activated, and allows the ELT to be armed, tested, and manually activated if necessary.

Modern ELTS also have the ability to transmit a signal on the 121.5 MHz frequency. This is an analog transmission that can be utilized for homing. Before 2009, 121.5 MHz was the worldwide emergency frequency monitored by the CORPAS-SARSAT satellites. Since then, it has been replaced by the 406 MHz standard. As the use of 406 MHz ELTs has not been made compulsory by the FAA, the 121.5 MHz frequency is still an active emergency frequency that is monitored by over-flying aircraft and control towers.

Most aircraft technicians are required to carry out annual inspections of 121.5 MHz ELTs and vet them as thoroughly as 406 MHz ELTs. As older ELTs lack built-in test circuitry, an operational test for such versions may include activating the signal. This can be achieved by removing the antenna and installing a dummy load.

If you find yourself in need of ELTs or ELT components, look no further than Aerospace Unlimited Services. Aerospace Unlimited Services has over 2 billion ready-to-purchase products, all of which are subjected to varying levels of quality assurance testing. For your ease of search, we have all of our items organized by part number, manufacturer, NSN, and more. Click on any one of our hot part numbers to be directed to an RFQ form. Within 15 minutes of submitting a form, an expert team member will reach out with a competitive quote for your comparisons. Initiate the procurement process today and see how Aerospace Unlimited Services can serve as your strategic sourcing partner!


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An emergency locator transmitter (ELT) is an independent battery-powered transmitter that is activated by the excessive G-forces exerted during an aircraft crash. They have the ability to transmit a digital signal every 50 seconds on a frequency of 406.025 MHz at 5 watts for a minimum of 24 hours. This signal can be received anywhere in the world by satellites in the COSPAS-SARSAT satellite system.

There are two types of satellites, those of which are called low earth orbiting (LEOSATs) and geostationary satellites (GEOSATs). The transmitted signal is partially processed and stored in these satellites before being relayed to ground stations referred to as local user terminals (LUTs). At this stage, the LUTs further decipher the signal, and the appropriate search and rescue operations are notified via mission control centers (MCCs).

Since their widespread implementation on commercial aircraft in the 1970s, ELTs have become commonplace in the aviation realm. Today, ELTs must be installed in aircraft according to FAR 91.207. For the most part, this encompasses most general aviation aircraft that do not operate under Parts 135 or 121. Furthermore, ELTs must be annually inspected for proper installation, battery corrosion, operation of the controls and crash sensor, and the presence of an ample signal at the antenna.

Beyond such inspections, built-in test equipment enables testing without the transmission of an emergency signal. The next part of the inspection is visual, and it must be recorded in maintenance records and on the outside of the ELT. Nonetheless, technicians are still warned to not accidentally activate the ELT and transmit an emergency distress signal.

ELTs are usually installed near the tail of an aircraft while the built-in G-force sensor is aligned with the longitudinal axis of the aircraft. ELTs that are equipped with an automatic G-force activation sensor mounted in the aircraft are easily removable. They contain a portable antenna, allowing crash victims to leave the site and carry the operating ELT with them. Meanwhile, a flight deck mounted panel alerts the pilots when the ELT is activated, and allows the ELT to be armed, tested, and manually activated if necessary.

Modern ELTS also have the ability to transmit a signal on the 121.5 MHz frequency. This is an analog transmission that can be utilized for homing. Before 2009, 121.5 MHz was the worldwide emergency frequency monitored by the CORPAS-SARSAT satellites. Since then, it has been replaced by the 406 MHz standard. As the use of 406 MHz ELTs has not been made compulsory by the FAA, the 121.5 MHz frequency is still an active emergency frequency that is monitored by over-flying aircraft and control towers.

Most aircraft technicians are required to carry out annual inspections of 121.5 MHz ELTs and vet them as thoroughly as 406 MHz ELTs. As older ELTs lack built-in test circuitry, an operational test for such versions may include activating the signal. This can be achieved by removing the antenna and installing a dummy load.

If you find yourself in need of ELTs or ELT components, look no further than Aerospace Unlimited Services. Aerospace Unlimited Services has over 2 billion ready-to-purchase products, all of which are subjected to varying levels of quality assurance testing. For your ease of search, we have all of our items organized by part number, manufacturer, NSN, and more. Click on any one of our hot part numbers to be directed to an RFQ form. Within 15 minutes of submitting a form, an expert team member will reach out with a competitive quote for your comparisons. Initiate the procurement process today and see how Aerospace Unlimited Services can serve as your strategic sourcing partner!


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Engine mounts are probably one of the most important parts in a vehicle or industrial machinery and can be found in airplanes, cars, trains, boats, buses, and any other equipment that necessitates a motor or engine. They are tasked with keeping engines in place, allowing any moving machine to optimally function. For example, when putting fragile components into a box and shaking the box around, the items inside will inevitably become damaged. However, if the components inside are secured with a mount, they will remain intact.

Typically made of rubber, good-quality engine mounts can reduce excess vibration, mitigate noise, and prevent engines from facing damage, which in turn extends the engine’s service life. More than that, rubber is resistant to ozone, water, oil, and other damaging elements, allowing mounts to properly perform even under tough conditions. Rubber is also available at a lower price point than other materials, making it a cost-effective choice.

Engine mounts are available in a variety of configurations depending on the application in question. As a result, most engine mounts are made to be compact, allowing them to fit in small spaces and environments. They are equipped with a molded rubber bushing or mount, which serves to dampen vibration. This is the area where the engine is normally attached. Additionally, there is a bolt that threads through the length of the motor mount, securing the entire assembly.

With countless engine mount designs, some of which are made with hydraulic fluid on the inside to offer more damping and flexibility, one of the biggest factors to consider is load capabilities. In most cases, engine mount shape, size, and material is determined by the load that will be applied to the mount and how much energy the mount is responsible for absorbing. It is also important to note that engine mount design depends on the application at hand.

The four most common types of engine mounts include single piece isolators, hydraulic engine mounts, two-piece mounts, and base plates for flange mounts.

Single Piece Isolators

Single piece isolators can be used as either the front or rear mounts of an engine set. These engine mounts are ideal for stationary applications since there is only an elastomer on the top section of the mount.

Hydraulic Engine Mounts

Hydraulic engine mounts have enhanced noise and vibration-resistant properties. The fluid inside the assembly is delivered via the internal orifices to offer a controlled spring rate. They are typically found in four-cylinder vehicles such as large trucks and buses.

Two-Piece Mounts

These mounts are feasible options for applications that have high rebound load cases like off road equipment.

Base Plates for Flange Mounts

For ease of installation, base plates for flange mounts are a great choice. The base flange makes it easy to attach the mount to other structures with the use of a bolt.  

Conclusion

As engine mounts are designed to absorb the energy of a particular system, they eventually become worn out over time and necessitate replacement. If you find yourself in need of engine mount parts or other related components, rely on Aerospace Unlimited Services for all your operational needs. With over 2 billion items in our inventory, all of which are subjected to rigorous quality assurance measures, you are bound to find what you need. We invite you to peruse our ever-expanding catalogs and kick off the procurement process with a competitive quote through our Instant RFQ service. Within 15 minutes of submission, a dedicated representative will reach out with a quote that meets your needs. Alternatively, you can call or email us directly; we are available 24/7x365. Contact us today and experience the future of part procurement with Aerospace Unlimited Services.


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Easier to start when compared to its propeller engine counterparts, jet engines only require compressed air and fuel to start. Jet engines are typically recognized for being a type of reaction engine that generates thrusts by jet propulsion.

A jet engine works by sucking air through the intake, sending the air through a fan equipped with a row of blades that compresses the air. Then, a majority of the air travels through the engine. This air is called bypass air, and it is used for the engine’s thrust, and to cool the engine. A final portion of the air dissipates as it goes through the “hot section” of the engine.

As the air travels through the “hot section,” it passes through 14 rows of compressor blades that further compress it. At this point, the hot compressed air passes into the combustion chamber where it mixes with fuel and burns. Within a jet engine, the fuel-air mixture burns at a constant rate, allowing the air to heat up, expand, and make its way out of the turbine blades.

Produced by Embraer, the Embraer ERJ 145 family is a series of twin-engine jets that contain five rows, two of which are high pressure turbines, and three that are low pressure turbines. As air passes through the turbines, the turbines, shaft, and compressor blades begin spinning. Hot air starts to make its way through the turbines, subsequently leaving the engine, and generating more thrust.

In order to get the engine to run, the engine core needs to spin at 14% of its maximum speed before the igniters can kickstart. Engine core speed is defined as “N2,” and is expressed as a percentage of maximum RPM. In an ERJ, 100% of the N2 is approximately 16,000 RPM; thus, the engine requires at least 2,200 RPM before the igniters can begin firing. That being said, the core should reach 28.5% of the N2, roughly a little over 4,500 RPM before the engine can introduce fuel and ignite the mixture.

Fuel is typically dispersed at 200 pounds per hour, which is about ½ a gallon per minute. To handle this much fuel, large amounts of compressed air is required in the combustion chamber. The most common source of compressed air includes an auxiliary power unit (APU).

Within a small turbine engine located near the tail of an aircraft, the APU provides compressed air and electricity. The auxiliary power unit is also tasked with powering an aircraft’s electrical systems on the ground, all the while serving as a backup generator for electrical and pneumatic requirements. In the case that the APU fails, you will require an external source of compressed air, the most common being a huffer cart. A huffer cart is an air compressor that can be mounted on the side of an aircraft, providing compressed air for starting an engine.

Lastly, air may also be sourced from a running engine. Turbine engines usually release bypass air, which can be distributed among multiple engines in an aircraft. If you open the bleeds on one engine, and open the crossbleed in another engine, your aircraft is ready to start.


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A glider, also known as a sailplane, is a type of aircraft that is primarily used for leisure activities and the sport of gliding. Unlike airliners and other similar fixed-wing aircraft, gliders are unpowered, taking advantage of naturally rising air to gain altitude and remain in the atmosphere. With their design, gliders are equipped to traverse a significant distance with small losses in altitude. To better understand how gliders work, and how they compare to other aircraft, we will discuss their design.

Fuselage

Like many other aircraft types, the fuselage is the main portion of the airframe where the wings and empennage are connected. At the front of the structure is the cockpit, opposite of the empennage that is attached at the back. Meanwhile, the wings extend from both sides. Generally, the fuselage may be composed of various materials, some of the most common including wood, fabric covered steel tubing, fiberglass, aluminum, Kevlar, or various combinations of each. While early gliders were constructed with wood and metal fasteners, they have since been upgraded to drastically reduce weight for performance.

Tow Hook Device

In order to begin soaring, gliders will often have a tow hook device that extends from the aircraft’s center of gravity or from the nose. When placed on the nose, such devices are used for aerotow procedures.

Wings

While devoid of engines, gliders still feature long, narrow wings that serve as their airfoils. Depending on the model, glider wings can range from 40 feet to 101.38 feet in length. Additionally, the wings are often fitted with various components that affect drag and lift, allowing for more control. Generally, these components include spoilers, dive brakes, and flaps.

Empennage

The empennage can be considered the tail of the aircraft, and such structures are where various stabilizing surfaces are placed. To amply control the glider as it traverses the atmosphere, the empennage is fitted with fixed and movable surfaces, including those such as the horizontal stabilizer, vertical fin, elevator, rudder, and trim tabs. The empennage itself may vary in shape as well, the most common designs being the conventional tail, T-tail, and V-tail. The conventional tail is designed with the horizontal stabilizer at the bottom of the vertical stabilizer. With a T-tail design, meanwhile, the horizontal stabilizer is placed atop the vertical stabilizer, establishing a “T” shaped tail, hence the name. Lastly, V-type designs feature two tail surfaces, both being mounted to create a “V” shape.

Landing Gear

For the landing gear of a glider, such assemblies consist of a main wheel, front skid or wheel, and a tailwheel or skid. For increased landing capability, many gliders will also feature wheels or skid plates that are attached to the end of each wing. If the glider is specifically designed for high-speed and low-drag flight, then the landing gear may even be fully retractable. Typically, a rope break or early release mechanism will be present so that the pilot has the ability to conduct a safe landing without having to stress over the entire landing checklist.

Conclusion

If you operate a glider and require various parts for maintenance or repairs, the experts at Aerospace Unlimited can help you secure everything you need with ease. With competitive pricing and rapid lead-times, we are your sourcing solution for aileron components, rudder parts, cockpit instruments, and much more. Take the time to explore our offerings, and our team is always on standby 24/7x365 to assist customers through the purchasing process as necessary. Get started with a competitive quote on items that you are interested in through the submission of an RFQ form as see how Aerospace Unlimited can serve as your strategic sourcing partner for all your needs. 


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Bearings are components that are paramount to the operations of countless assemblies, serving to constrain motion while also minimizing friction between moving parts. Bearings can come in numerous shapes and forms, thrust bearings being a common type that are implemented in assemblies to absorb axial loads. As bearings that are typically found within automobile gearboxes, radio antenna masts, and other various automotive, marine, and aerospace applications, having a general understanding of thrust bearings and their use can be beneficial.

As stated before, thrust bearings are best fit for taking on the axial loads of a particular assembly. Axial loads are those that are transmitted linearly along a shaft, stemming from various sources such as the forward thrust of boats or the rotation of a propeller powered by a piston aircraft engine. Rotating between parts in motion, thrust bearings may come in a number of forms to facilitate diverse operations.

Thrust ball bearings are those that take advantage of bearing balls that are placed within a ring, accommodating the operations of low thrust applications that exhibit low axial loads. Cylindrical thrust roller bearings, meanwhile, feature cylindrical rollers that are specifically oriented with their axes facing the axis of the bearing. While cost-efficient and featuring high load carrying capacities, such thrust bearings can face wear due to their varying radial speeds and friction. Tapered roller thrust bearings are another common roller thrust bearing, featuring small tapered rollers instead of cylindrical rollers. These tapered rollers are oriented with their axes covering on the axis of the bearing, and the design of the component directly affects how smoothly the rollers are able to roll. Tapered roller thrust bearings are the most common variation for automobiles, capable of taking on axial and radial loads.

Spherical roller thrust bearings feature asymmetrical rollers that are shaped like spheres, placed within a spherical raceway. With their specific design, spherical roller thrust bearings are suited for taking on both radial and axial loads, all while aiding the misalignment of shafts. Generally, spherical roller thrust bearings are paired with radial spherical roller bearings. With the use of fluid bearings, axial thrust can be taken on with the assistance of a pressurized liquid layer, ensuring that drag is mitigated during operations. The final major type of thrust bearing is the magnetic bearing, that of which takes on axial thrust through the use of a magnetic field. Generally, these bearings are used for high speed operations and provide low drag.

As certain bearings differ in their ability to take on certain loads or operational conditions, it is crucial that purchasing decisions are made with ample consideration for the application in question. To ensure proper functionality, reliability, and a long service life for a particular bearing, it should be of the correct type, material, size, and shape for the system or assembly that it will be installed in. After factoring in all operational requirements and bearing characteristics as necessary, Aerospace Unlimited can help you secure all the radial bearing, roller bearing, and thrust bearing components you need with unmatched prices and service.


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In order for aircraft to maintain heavier-than-air flight over significant distances, they require some form of power generation for the means of producing thrust and propulsion. For many early aircraft and those that are lightweight or general aviation types, the piston engine serves as the most common solution for maintaining flight. Piston engines can come in a variety of forms, some common types being the inline engine, radial engine, horizontally opposed engine, and V-type engine. While each of these types may differ in their construction and operation to some degree, all function through a common working principle.

Across all piston engine types, one or more pistons are placed within cylinders and situated in various configurations. The cylinder is the area in which gas is introduced with the fuel injection system, and it is mixed together with intake air through the movements of the piston before being ignited. The ignition system of a typical piston engine will commonly use a magneto, and such devices are used to create a spark powerful enough to reach the cylinder and ignite mixtures. The resulting combustive force and gases from ignition will drive the piston upwards, this movement being harnessed by a connecting rod and crankshaft for the means of converting linear motion into a rotational motion. The rotational motion created through combustion is important driving the propellers of the aircraft for flight. After the piston has driven the crankshaft assembly, it can then force the exhaust gases out of the cylinder before repeating the cycle again.

Depending on the type of aircraft and its piston engine, the general operation of pistons may slightly vary. Generally, each type will differ on the number of cylinders that they contain, and various orientations may feature a circular design with a central crankshaft, multiple cylinders situated within a line, or other such configurations. Based on the construction of the cylinders and their number, the timing of piston firing may also differ by model so that smooth operations are achieved without any delay in combustion. While the amount of strokes and cylinders for engine operation may vary by engine type, the general rule of thumb is that more cylinders can further spread power pulses for smoother functionality.

Piston engines are often compared to gas turbine engines, and their operational characteristics and capabilities are set apart from one another. While the piston engine creates power through the conversion of linear motion and pressure, gas turbine engines utilize the pressure of ignited gases to drive a turbine for thrust generation. While the gas turbine engine may be capable of achieving higher amounts of power and can be very reliable, such engine types are not suitable for many smaller aircraft due to their size and weight. As a result, a piston engine that drives a propeller assembly ensures optimal flight characteristics for such aircraft.

As piston engines operate with numerous moving assemblies and high amounts of heat, it is important that they are regularly inspected and maintained to ensure their continued operability and efficiency. To prevent heat from damaging components, engines should be well lubricated with cooling oil and the cooling system should be able to efficiently mitigate extreme temperatures. Furthermore, the engine should be operated regularly as well, as a sitting engine can be susceptible to rust and other forms of corrosion over time.


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The exhaust section of a gas turbine engine is paramount for heat dissipation and performance, ensuring that spent gases are optimally expelled from the engine after combustion. While varying engines may contain different components and complex assemblies, the common function of all exhaust parts is to direct spent gases out of the engine in such a way that an efficient exit velocity is reached without causing turbulence. 

The main sections of the gas turbine engine include the exhaust cone, tailpipe, and exhaust nozzle. The exhaust cone is the section of the aircraft engine that follows the turbine assembly, and it gathers the expanding gases that pass through the turbine blades so that they may be directed into a solid flow. By converting the stream of gas, the exhaust cone can cut down the velocity of the gas while increasing its pressure. For the design of the exhaust cone, the section contains an outer shell, inner cone, multiple radial hollow struts, and tie rods for support.

The outer shell of the assembly is tasked with collecting exhaust gases, and it often comes in the form of a stainless steel assembly which is connected to the turbine case rear flanges. If there is a need for temperature thermocouples within the assembly, the duct may be designed with thermocouple bosses. The struts are also attached to the outer duct, and they serve as supports for the inner cone which sits in the middle of the exhaust duct. Struts are also useful for straightening the flow of exhaust, ensuring that they exit at a proper angle for beneficial operations. The inner cone is placed near the rear face of the turbine disk, and it serves to prevent exiting exhaust gases from causing turbulence. The inner cone may also feature a small hole at the exit tip, and this allows for air circulation to cool the turbine wheel.

The tailpipe is the next major section of the aircraft gas turbine engine, and they are often designed with semiflexible characteristics. For certain tailpipe constructions, a bellows arrangement may be implemented for the means of moving the tailpipe during thermal expansion, maintenance, and installation. With such capabilities of movement, the tailpipe is less at risk of warping under stress. As the high temperatures of combustion can result in heat radiating from the exhaust cone and tailpipe, engineers often implement insulation for the protection of airframe components. While there are numerous solutions that may serve for thermal protection, shrouds and insulation blankets are the most common as they can protect assemblies and increase performance.

The exhaust nozzle is the final section of the engine, and it may be a converging design for subsonic gas velocities or a converging-diverging design for the means of supersonic gas velocities. The nozzle opening may also have a fixed or variable area, the fixed area being fairly simplistic due to its lack of moving parts. It is important that fixed area nozzles are optimally designed so that the engine does not choke during operations and can achieve optimal thrust. When an augmenter or afterburner is implemented in the engine, the exhaust nozzle will come in the form of the variable area type as it will need to extend its open area to accommodate the increased mass of flow. If the augementer or afterburner is shut-off, the exhaust nozzle can adjust to a smaller opening.


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A pressure sensor is a device capable of converting pressure into an electrical signal. They have a wide range of uses in many different applications, so the type of pressure sensor you are using for a given task matters. For example, a pressure sensor that does a good job of measuring oil and gas may not be ideal for measuring hydraulic fluids. Prior to purchasing a pressure sensor, it is important to consider all types to determine which one will best suit your needs.

The first type of pressure sensor is the chemical vapor deposition pressure sensor. Chemical Vapor Deposition, or CVD, is a process used to produce highly stable strain gauge pressure transducers. This process offers a reliable option where many other low-cost pressure sensors would fail. Within each of these transducers is an ASIC chip which offers high levels of linearity correction. CVD pressure sensors are ideal for applications including off-highway, HVAC, and semiconductor processing. Pressure transducers of this type also have a thicker diaphragm, allowing them to handle intense pulsating pressures.

A second type of pressure sensor is the sputtered thin film pressure sensor. Of all types, these are the most dependable. They are known for their long-term durability and high accuracy, even in harsh conditions. Depending on the application, sensors of this type are available in ranges from 0-100 to 0-30,000 PSI. Sputtered thin film pressure sensors offer unrivaled performance in volatile environmental scenarios including high temperatures, intense shock & vibration, and massive pressure spikes. They are fit for applications such as off-highway, fire protection, refrigeration, and alternative fuel.

The next type of pressure sensor, variable capacitance pressure sensors, are ideal when you need a dependable means of measuring low pressure. These are available in ranges from 0-2 PSI to 0-15 PSI, allowing them to accommodate many applications. Their unique characteristics include a sturdy physical configuration, stainless steel & ceramic wetted parts, and variable capacitor technology. They can also be used for high pressure applications such as industrial engines, hydraulic systems, process control, and natural gas pipelines.

The fourth type of pressure sensors are ideal for applications with high shock and vibration. These are solid-state pressure sensors. They are switches featuring a hermetic stainless steel diaphragm. These sensors provide high accuracy measurements where tight system controls are needed, and are more advantageous than electromechanical pressure switches when actuations exceed fifty cycles per minute. They are used in the off-highway, medical, gas, compressor, and other industrial applications.

The final type of pressure sensors are micro machined silicon (MMS) strain gauge sensors. These offer a cost effective solution for low pressures in absolute, compound, and gauge references. MMS pressure sensors feature stainless steel parts in addition to an all-welded construction that is resistant to harsh environments and chemicals. They are most commonly used in applications such as air conditioning refrigerant recovery, gas analysis instrumentation, and medical sterilizers.


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A valve is a device used to regulate, control, or direct the flow of fluid within a system or process by opening, closing, or partially obstructing it. In piping, many different types of valves are used in varying applications. Valves have an important role within piping systems and often account for up to 30% of the overall piping system costs. However, choosing the wrong type of valve for your system can increase costs markedly, making valve selection as essential to the economics of your system as it is to the operation. 

Gate Valve

The first and most common type of valve is the gate valve. These are linear motion valves used to start or stop fluid flow. During operation, the gate valve is either fully open or fully closed. They are used in nearly all fluid services including air, fuel gas, feedwater, steam, lubricant oil, hydrocarbon, and more.

Globe Valve

The globe valve is a type of valve used to stop, start, or regulate fluid flow. These are frequently used in systems where flow control is required but leak prevention is also critical. They provide better shut off than gate valves, but are also more expensive.

Check Valve

Check valves are used to prevent backflow of fluid in a piping system. The pressure of the fluid passing through a pipe opens the valve, while any reverse flow closes the valve.

Plug Valves

A plug valve is a quarter-turn rotary motion valve that utilizes a tapered or cylindrical plug to stop and start fluid flow. They are used as on-off stop valves and are capable of providing bubble-tight shut off. As such, they can be used in vacuum and other high-pressure and high-temperature applications.

Ball Valve

Ball valves are another type of quarter-turn rotary motion valve, but these use a ball-shaped disk to control the flow. Most ball valves are of the quick-acting type, which require a 90° turn to operate the valve. Ball valves operate similarly to gate valves, but are smaller and lighter.

Butterfly Valve

A butterfly valve is a quarter-turn rotary motion valve that can stop, start, or regulate flow. This valve features a short, circular body and a compact lightweight design, making it ideal for large valve applications due to the fact it takes up very little space.

Needle Valve

Needle valves have a similar design to that of globe valves, but feature a needle-like disk. They are designed to provide accurate flow control within piping systems with small diameters. Their name is derived from their pointed conical disc and corresponding seat.

Pinch Valves

Also known as clamp valves, pinch valves are linear motion valves used to start, regulate, and stop fluid flow. They utilize a rubber tube known as a pinch tube, and a pinch mechanism that regulates flow. Pinch valves are frequently used to handle liquids with significant amounts of suspended solids or in systems that pneumatically convey solid materials.

Pressure Relief Valves

These valves, also known as pressure safety valves, are used to protect equipment or systems from overpressure events or vacuums. They are designed to release pressure at a predetermined setting to prevent these from occurring.


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While computer hardware was often expensive and fairly unobtainable for the standard consumer during the technology’s infancy, prices have since seen a steady drop leading into the present. Now, consumers have much easier access and ability to create more complex and powerful systems with common components available on the market. With a number of consumer motherboards now offering more than one slot for CPU attachment, shared-memory processors can be used to achieve higher system performance for a number of applications.

Shared-memory processors are a type of system that contains multiple processors that may carry out their operations together. Through a shared interconnection network, the processors can utilize the same pool of memory and communicate with one another to carry out various procedures. As such, computers with shared-memory processors can exhibit a significant difference in their computation power as compared to standard work stations with only one processor. As these assemblies are typically geared more towards demanding applications and processes that may require large amounts of program execution, many casual users may not find much use in running a shared-memory processor set-up.

In the case of an internet, database, or network server, however, having the most processors possible is paramount to smooth operations and ensuring that the servers are able to accommodate periods of high usage and user loads. Additionally, shared-memory processors can also serve to streamline certain applications, as a computer system can utilize large amounts of power to conduct a single job rather than computing a high number of small jobs at the same time. When connecting processors together, each processor is joined from their independent data caches to a shared memory pool through a single interconnection network.

Known as symmetric multiprocessing hardware, such components allow for the assembly and pairing of multiple processors so that each CPU has equal control over memory and peripherals. Across most symmetric multiprocessing hardware assemblies, buses and crossbars serve as the primary method for interconnection. In regard to computer hardware, a bus is a component that allows for data to be transferred, and they are commonly seen on many motherboards for the connection of memory, CPUs, and more. A crossbar, on the other hand, is a component containing a series of switches that may be used to conduct information processing applications. Out of the two symmetric multiprocessing hardware pieces, the bus serves as the most convenient and common approach for establishing a shared-memory multiprocessor assembly. With the bus, connections for parts, protocols, and hardware are all provided to facilitate operations with ease. As buses are limited in their ability to handle high amounts of data traffic, it is important that loads do not exceed the performance standards of the bus as to avoid bottlenecking.

With the use of a crossbar, bottlenecking is avoided as multiple paths may operate simultaneously on a grid-like system. As an example, a 4x5 crossbar could allow for up to four active data transfers to be conducted at the same time. By having a higher number of active paths as compared to a singular shared bus, more performance can be achieved. While these advantages are clearly desirable, crossbar components typically range much higher in price, and their cost only increases as the load raises. Due to this, crossbars are mostly reserved for the most high-end applications.


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Ice can quickly accumulate, as you can usually tell just by looking or using your car on a very cold day. In cold climates, the ice can stick to your windows, blocking your windows. Not only that, but they can also make certain mechanisms stuck (such as a door or a gear) and result in your car not functioning at all, leaving you stranded where you are. These same issues can also affect an aircraft. As an aircraft needs to be functioning at full capacity in order to safely transport its passengers across the skies, the need to apply an anti-icing solution is even more detrimental. The process of using an anti-icing system is somewhat akin to someone applying a deicing solution to the windows of a vehicle before driving. In principle or idea, they are the same, but as you go through the process, you start to notice the differences. In this article, we will break down the process of using an anti-icing system, and also discuss why using these tools is so important.

Plane deicing is a strategy that consists of warming and applying deicing fluid onto the plane windows and wings. The significance of doing this is pivotal because this method ensures the eventual melting of snow that has been cemented onto the plane and, if not removed, could bargain the security of its next flight. The basic idea behind an anti-icing system is to tackle the cause that is making the outer atmosphere conditions to result in ice that can damage your vessel. You can take steps to prevent this by simply hangaring your plane. Hangaring the plane can shield it from ice and precipitation. Before leaving the plane in the safe space, you would need to ensure that there are no traces of water left on its surface, as these surfaces could be at risk of accumulating ice even inside the capacity. That is why it is ideal to clear any traces of water before you store the plane. Various habits by which you can shield ice from forming is by putting wing canvases or covers onto the plane. While it may not be 100% secure against ice, this procedure, notwithstanding the hangaring and water ejection philosophy, can spare time and costs.

There are also some parts and components of the aviation anti icing process and equipment that are important to have for deicing a plane. These constitute stream control valve, deicing boots, heat spread, and pitot tube. The stream valve is significant because it  utilizes a solenoid valve that engages air from the direct to stream into the gadget system. The valve opens once the device is enabled by the de-icing switch. This enables the contraption to work and warm the ice off from the vessel’s edges. Other tools that you can use include deicing boots. They are stretchy rubbery parts that are placed onto the corners of the fuselage, vertical stabilizer and the wing. They work by breaking down any ice accumulating at any point on the plane. Deicing boots are bulky pieces of rubber that are fastened onto the leading edges of an aircraft, typically the vertical stabilizer and the wing. They work by inflating any time there is an accumulation of ice buildup.

Once they’re inflated, snow or ice begin to crack on the surface. Eventually it flies off entirely, leaving no residue of snow. A heat blanket can also be used to cover the surface of an aircraft. The blanket works by trapping heat onto the surface and thus preventing any snow or ice from accumulating. Lastly, the pitot tube is significant because the freezing of these tubes can cause your airspeed indicator to fail. The airspeed indicator receives data on ram pressure but if the pitot tube is frozen over, that can alter the numbers. You may be flying slower than the airspeed indicator perceives. In this case, it is the pilot’s responsibility to descend to altitudes that are free of icing conditions and land, after which aircraft personnel can focus on deicing the pitot tube.

For more information on applying anti icing systems and solutions, contact the team at Aerospace Unlimited. We are the premier supplier of aviation, military, and defense parts. Not only do we provide anti-icing systems in airplanes, but we also stock pneumatic systems and systems for wing leading edge. Get in touch with us today!


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As we continue to move through these unprecedented times during the COVID-19 pandemic, more United States manufacturers are stepping up to aid in the supply shortage of ventilators and masks that are desperately needed by medical professionals and other affected sectors. Leading into June, car manufacturer Ford has joined companies such as 3M and General Electric to aid the medical community in this initiative.

Currently, Ford is not the only carmaker to contribute to the pandemic efforts, as similar decisions have also recently been made by companies such as Tesla and General Motors. Medical equipment such as medical masks and ventilators are a crucial need to treat an increasing number of symptomatic carriers, and shortages have proven to be a major issue currently. With the help of Ford, 3M’s output of powered air-purifying respirator (PAPR) masks is to be expanded. With an increase in production, state governments and other sectors may see more supply of needed medical equipment.

Together with 3M, Ford hopes to increase the manufacturing and supply of PAPR masks as quickly as possible, and they seek to utilize established technologies and products from their respective companies to aid in the effort. Ford also claims to be working alongside the health care division of GE in order to create a more simplistic ventilator. Without furthering information, Ford claimed that ventilators could be produced at both Ford and GE locations concurrently. As droplets from a person’s coughing or sneezing may lead to infection with the novel coronavirus, Ford also seeks to begin testing and production of new face shields that may further protect the medical professionals who are in close proximity with affected patients and individuals.

Other car manufacturers, such as General Motors and Tesla, have also been making strides in the production and supply effort with their respective initiatives. Recently, GM announced that they are partnering with Ventec Life Systems, a manufacturer of ventilators, to increase their logistics, manufacturing, and issues to improve output. Tesla has also been aiding in supply, providing ventilators to the state of California in March. For the University of Washington’s Medical Center, Tesla sent around 50,000 3M produced N95 surgical masks.

While companies such as Ford, General Motors, and Tesla have recently joined the fight against the pandemic, they are not alone in their efforts. Through the past months and moving into the future, we are seeing a great increase in United States companies working to fortify the strained medical infrastructure and medical care system. From boosting the supply chain for sourcing supplies and hastening production of highly needed medical materials, many American companies are spearheading manufacturing initiatives to combat COVID-19. As we continue to protect people and various sectors from the devastating effect of the virus, we may see even more companies step in to provide support.

Ensuring that you have the medical equipment that you need for protecting yourself, employees, and others is very important during these unprecedented times. When you are ready to begin sourcing medical equipment and related medical supplies that you need for your operations, Aerospace Unlimited has you covered with everything you are searching for. Aerospace Unlimited is owned and operated by ASAP Semiconductor, and we can help you find the aviation, NSN, and electronic parts that you are searching for, new or obsolete. As a premier supplier of parts for the aerospace, civil aviation, and defense industries, we're always available and ready to help you find all the parts and equipment you need, 24/7x365. ASAP Semiconductor is an FAA AC 00-56B accredited and ISO 9001:2015 certified enterprise. For a quick and competitive quote, email us at sales@aerospaceunlimited.com or call us at +1-412-212-0606.


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Within the realm of aviation, landing gear proves to be one of the most important systems of the entire aircraft. Through the many aircraft landing gear components working together, an aircraft is able to touch ground and come to a stop safely and efficiently, avoiding damages. This is due to their specifically engineered designs that are in place to meet various requirements of weight, size, performance, and beyond as per FAA regulations. In this blog, we will discuss the aircraft landing gear system and how it helps bring an aircraft safely to a stop after flight.

Aircraft landing gear components work together to aid the aircraft during taxiing, landing, and take-off operations. Due to various needs and requirements surrounding these operations, landing gear is more often than not the first consideration and designed component of an aircraft. Designing and manufacturing landing gear can be a lengthy process due to having to uphold various required airworthiness regulations and to best serve the aircraft they are intended for. Depending on the type of aircraft and its application, different designs and equipment may be utilized as well.

To achieve a successful landing, each of the aircraft landing gear components have their own functionality and purpose. Piston landing gear, such as airplane wheels, are often fitted with shock absorbers to take the impact forces of landing off of the fuselage, and wheels also allow for taxiing around a runway. Disc brake and other brake types on the wheels have the important function of slowing down the aircraft speed until it can safely stop or taxi. Airplane wheels may also be installed in various numbers and arrangements, the most common being the taildragger and tricycle undercarriage. Often, landing gear may have the ability to be retractable and can be deployed and/or retracted into the fuselage while in flight with the aid of hydraulic systems. With retractable landing gear, aircraft can reduce drag that would be caused by the wheels and other systems.

Future plans for developing landing gear technologies include using high strength materials, damping systems, and electronic actuation. With high strength materials, fatigue and corrosion can be reduced for longer equipment lifespan. Damping systems are important to reduce fatigue and wear as well, as these electronic systems are slowly proving to be a very viable alternative for the replacement of hydraulic actuation systems. This is due to the fact that electric actuation systems are beginning to compete in weight, and do not have the problem of flammability and leaking that hydraulic systems have. Beyond these examples, there are many other goals of the aviation community to bring improvements to landing gear design and functionality.

When designing or maintaining your aircraft landing gear system, know that Aerospace Unlimited has you covered with our expansive inventory of over six billion parts. We understand that the parts procurement process can seem difficult, so we work to make it as simple as possible for you. Our expert staff are on hand to aid our customers with any questions that they may have during the purchasing process, and we can provide quick lead-times on hard to find and obsolete components.

Aerospace Unlimited is owned and operated by ASAP Semiconductor, and we can help you find arm assembly torque parts and other aviation components you need, new or obsolete. As a premier supplier of parts for the aerospace, civil aviation, and defense industries, we're always available and ready to help you find all the parts and equipment you need, 24/7x365. Our dedication to quality and our customers is why we are proud to be an FAA AC 00-56B accredited and ISO 9001:2015 certified enterprise. For a quick and competitive quote, email us at sales@aerospaceunlimited.com or call us at +1-412-212-0606.


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PMA stands for Parts Manufacturer Approval. This approval is what allows for manufacturers to produce and sell articles for installation on type certification products. The approval can only be given by the United States Federal Aviation Administration. Simply put, the FAA is required to utilize the PMA process to greenlight the design and manufacturing of certain aviation and aerospace parts. Designing, manufacturing, distributing and operating with such a part that has not gone through the approval process is illegal and subject to severe punishments. For more information on how the PMA process works, you can read more about it in the article below.

You can observe a great example of the PMA process when aviation companies need to acquire replacement parts (such as an aircraft brake) for a commercial or corporate jet. In order to procure these parts, they must ensure that the desired piece passes the PMA phase. This involves the FAA identifying airworthiness standards before applying them to the part and then determining the criticality of this part. The two FAA branches involved in implementing this are the Aircraft Certification Offices (ACO’s) and the Manufacturing Inspection District Offices (MIDO’s). Afterwards, aviation authorities would submit a test plan for its design approval and if passed, establish an inspection system to scrutinize the nooks and crannies of the piece.

If the piece passes this phase of the process, the PMA part would then need established instructions for repair and inspection, followed by instructions for a continued operational safety plan. Once everything has been set in place and tests have been run enough times to prove the airworthiness of the part, only then can the ACO and MIDO give the final approval that the part is suitable enough to fly the skies.

At Aerospace Unlimited, owned and operated by ASAP Semiconductor, we can help you find aircraft components and accessories you need, new or obsolete. As a premier supplier of parts for the aerospace, civil aviation, and defense industries, we're always available and ready to help you find all the parts and equipment you need, 24/7x365. For a quick and competitive quote, email us at sales@aerospaceunlimited.com or call us at +1-412-212-0606.


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Aircraft wings are airfoils that attach to the body of an aircraft at different angles and shapes to create lift and sustain flight. Different wing configurations provide variant flight characteristics like the amount of lift generated, the level of control at different operating speeds, aircraft stability and flight balance. Aircraft wings may be attached at the bottom, mid or top of the fuselage. The wing tip can be pointed, rounded or square and the wing can extend out from the fuselage perpendicularly , angled down or slightly up. The angle at which a wing extends out from the fuselage’s horizontal state is called the dihedral angle and this affects an aircraft’s lateral stability.

Wings are mostly constructed using aluminum, but they can also be made using wood covered with fabric, magnesium alloy, carbon fiber, and in modern aircraft, stronger and lighter materials like titanium. The framing of aircraft wings are outlined by beam like spars. The ribs of a wing are connected to these spars and provide sound structure and stability. Lastly, the entire aircraft from fuselage to wingspan is covered in a skin that ensures the aircraft moves through the sky as one unified body.

There are 9 types of wing design that each offer their own unique capabilities. The rectangle wing (not aerodynamically efficient) is your basic non-tapered, straight wing, mostly used in small aircraft, extending perpendicular to the fuselage. Elliptical wings (most aerodynamically efficient) induce the lowest possible drag and their thin wing structure was initially designed to house landing gear, ammunition and guns inside the wing. The chord of a tapered wing varies across it’s span for approximate elliptical lift distribution.

Delta wings are triangular in shape and lay over the fuselage. Their low aspect ratio makes them ideal in supersonic, subsonic, and transonic flight. These wings have improved maneuverability and reduced wing loading but due to their low aspect ratio, do have a high induced drag. Trapezoidal wings offer outstanding flight performance, highly efficient supersonic flight, and have great stealth characteristics. Ogive wings are designed for very high speeds, have minimal drag at supersonic speeds, but are very complex and difficult to manufacture. Most high-speed commercial aircraft use a swept-back wing design that reduces drag at transonic speeds. Forward-swept wings have controllability issues and because of the flow characteristics the outboard wings stall before the flaps. Variable sweep wings were designed to optimize flight experience over a range of speeds and have three modes of extension: straight out to the side, slightly back, and farther back to create a triangle shaped aircraft.

At Aerospace Unlimited, owned and operated by ASAP Semiconductor, we can help you find the aircraft wing components you need, new or obsolete. As a premier supplier of parts for the aerospace, civil aviation, and defense industries, we're always available and ready to help you find all the parts and equipment you need, 24/7x365. For a quick and competitive quote, email us at sales@aerospaceunlimited.com or call us at +1-412-212-0606.


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